Can Prescription Drugs Cause Ringing in the Ears?

Can Prescription Drugs Cause Ringing In the Ears?

Tinnitus, or a ringing in the ears (this can also be a whooshing or pulsing), is generally the first symptom of ototoxicity and is generally short lived, but it can have more permanent symptoms.

About Tinnitus

Simply defined, tinnitus is a phantom ringing, whooshing, or buzzing noise in your ear that only you can hear. People experience tinnitus in a variety of ways: In some, a headshake will make the annoyance vanish; others, however, describe the condition as debilitating. Though research is ongoing, there is currently no cure. But relief can come from a variety of treatments.

About Ototoxicity

Ototoxicity is a poisoning of the inner ear due to exposure to or ingestion of medications or chemicals that can cause tinnitus, hearing loss, and/or balance disorders. High doses or long-term use of certain antibiotics, antidepressants, loop diuretics, pain relievers, and prescription or over-the-counter medications can cause ototoxicity.

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Staying Steady on Your Feet

5 Tips to Protect Against Falls

How’s your balance?

Falls are the second leading cause of accidental death, per the World Health Organization. They’re also associated with hearing impairment, which can affect your balance.

According to research, falls are more common among people with hearing loss. In one study of more than 2,000 adults ages 40 to 69, patients with mild hearing loss were nearly three times as likely to report a fall in the previous year. Plus, every 10-decibel increase in hearing loss also meant a 1.4-fold increase in the odds of a fall the prior year.

The findings, from researchers at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine and the National Institute on Aging, were consistent with past research linking hearing loss and increased risk of falls.

Reduce your risk with these five tips:

Get your vision checked. Being able to see rocky terrain or unstable surfaces will help keep you safe. Tying in with our …

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Over-the-Counter Hearing Help

Are You Wasting Cash on Over-the-Counter Hearing Aids?

Learn why self-treating hearing problems with personal sound amplification products might not be a better value after all.

Big-box stores, warehouse clubs, and online retailers have made it easier than ever to buy over-the-counter hearing devices or personal sound amplification products (PSAPs), but… not so fast! For hearing loss, the help of a trained hearing care professional stands head and shoulders above self-treatment, which can cause more harm than good.

What Are Personal Sound Amplification Products?

PSAPs, defined by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration as “wearable electronic products for use by non-hearing impaired individuals to amplify sounds in certain environments,” typically comprise a microphone, an amplifier, and a receiver.

Though potentially helpful in normal hearing to amplify sounds in situations such as watching TV, listening for animals during outdoor recreation, or hearing a presenter who’s speaking some distance away, PSAPs can’t take the place of …

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Is It “TIN-uh-tis” or “tin-EYE-tis”?

Is It “TIN-uh-tis” or “tin-EYE-tis”?

Americans love to debate how to say certain words: Is “tomato” pronounced “tuh-MAY-toe” or “tuh-MAH-toe”? Does the “ee” in “creek” sound like “sneak” or “pick”? By the 1930s, this kind of debate had become so common that it was immortalized in the song “Let’s Call the Whole Thing Off.” Now we can safely add another word to the list of popular debates: tinnitus.

If you search the web for ways to say “tinnitus,” you’ll find that dictionaries disagree, language experts disagree, and medical experts disagree, with passionate, well-reasoned defenses on all sides. How is anyone supposed to know the right answer?

At our practice, you can pronounce “tinnitus” however you’d like. Our concern is helping you get relief from your tinnitus — that persistent ringing, buzzing, or pulsing in your ears.  

What Is Tinnitus?

Tinnitus affects more than 50 million Americans, but not everyone experiences it in the same …

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You’ll Be the Talk of the Picnic Table

These Delicious Side Dishes Are Good for Your Blood Sugar and Your Hearing

According to the National Institutes of Health, those with diabetes are twice as likely to have hearing loss. Because we’re deep into the grilling months, we’re offering a couple of delicious diabetes-friendly side-dish recipes for your next cookout that will tickle taste buds, turn heads, and take it easy on your blood sugar.

Stuffed Mushrooms

Ingredients (serves 12) Stuffing

6 oz Mexican chorizo sausage ½ cup onion, finely chopped 2 cloves garlic, minced 1 can (11 oz) whole-kernel corn, drained 2 oz low-fat cream cheese ¼ cup fat-free sour cream ½ tsp salt

  Remaining ingredients

2 slices whole-wheat bread 24 stuffer mushroom caps (or large, de-stemmed mushrooms)

 

Directions

Preheat oven to 400°. Cook de-cased chorizo, onion, and garlic in a skillet over medium heat for 6 minutes or until browned, stirring to crumble. Drain chorizo mixture and pat dry with paper towels. Combine chorizo mixture and corn …

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